“But it’s SO pretty!”

Our plans for the weekend? Cancelled. Because of the OMGSNOW.

Our grocery delivery today? Cancelled. Because of the OMGSNOW. (So no food for us then, kids!)

Terry’s transplant checkup tomorrow? Cancelled. Because of the OMGSNOW.

Some flights going out of Glasgow airport today? Cancelled. Because of the OMGSNOW.

Our holiday next week? Better not be cancelled because of the … oh, you know the rest.  The jury is still out on that one. I invite you to join with me in a COMPLETE AND UTTER PANIC about it though. Because that will help.

Oh, and our business? Losing money, because people don’t want to read fashion blogs when they could be talking about the snow instead. Next person to tell me they’re “SO! JEALOUS!” or that I should be grateful I’m not them because, whew, it’s just so darn hot where they are, will be responsible for the instant explosion of my head, seriously.

Needless to say, I’m most annoyed about the transplant appointment. I mean, it’s just a checkup, but it’s important for our peace of mind to know that everything is OK, and I had really hoped we could get that reassurance before we leave the country – if, indeed, we actually get to leave the country. They won’t even reschedule it at this point*, though: the woman who called me said she has no idea when they’ll be able to get things back to normal. And the whole thing just makes me panicky, to be honest. Yesterday I kept worrying about what would happen if there was an emergency and the ambulance couldn’t get into the street (which happened countless times last winter). Today, at least I know that wouldn’t matter because there’s no staff at the hospital anyway.

Snow: it’s my new mortal enemy. I think I might hate it even more than crabs.**

* EDIT: They just called and confirmed they can’t reschedule it until the day we’re due to leave. We’ll be leaving the house at 6am to catch our flight, so obviously that’s no good. They also keep referring to me as: “Mrs My-oh-lus” for some reason.

** I take that back. Nothing is worse than crabs.


Tags

24 Comments

  • After last year, I think snow is pretty from a (very great) distance, but HORRIBLE TO LIVE WITH. My commiserations, hon’! I hope the bloody stuff melts TODAY!! (Hear me snow… Hear my hair dryer?!? :)

  • Roisin says:

    I hope the snow hasn’t set in now for the winter. Stressing about flights being cancelled is so horrible – I think you and I are similar in the way this bothers us because I’m already worried that inclement weather will stop my flight home on 22nd December for Christmas! Between one thing and another this year has been a bad one for flying (stupid volcanic ash!)

    The hospital thing is very bad. I mean, I know that getting to work when it’s snowing and icy is difficult but the PCT or whoever runs the hospital should have some sort of continuity plan in place. It’s not like snow should be unexpected in Scotland – and what about the people in the hospital? “I’m sorry, you can’t have your important surgery because the anaesthetist’s drive is icy” – it really seems like there should be a better way to handle the WEATHER!

    • Amber says:

      I was actually just thinking about how I spent May thinking the volcanic ash was going to cancel my flight to the States, and now I’m worried about the snow cancelling this one : I should probably stop booking flights – it seems to be just tempting fate! Our flight back is on December 21st, so if we DO get there, I’m now wondering if we’ll get back OK, or have the pleasure of the overnight stay in the airport again!

      I know what you mean about the hospitals – I do find it a bit odd that they don’t seem to have some kind of contingency plans for bad weather. We’re lucky in that Terry’s appointment is just a check up, but it’s not like people can just reschedule their illnesses! And once again, I’m surprised by the, er, surprise. This snow has been forecast since last week – why weren’t the roads gritted in advance, etc?

      On a slightly happier note, though, I ordered the Jailhouse dress last night “to cheer myself up”. Now I just have to hope it gets here before I leave :)

      • Roisin says:

        Aw, good on you. It’s even prettier in real life, I love the buttons and the little belt! I’ve just ordered the Bettie Page Jazmin dress I blogged about. I have no excuse, I just want it. I hope you’ll put up some pictures of you in the Jailhouse dress when you wear it.

        Fingers and toes and everything else crossed for your flight getting out of Glasgow airport! I’m trying desperately not to think about mine but I’m rubbish at keeping those thoughts at bay. Internet shopping definitely helps, though.

        • Amber says:

          Ah, I absolutely love the Jazmin dress – was so tempted to get the polka dot version! Which colour are you getting? I have the Rita dress from Bettie Page, and it’s one of my favourites of all my dresses – I could buy everything from that brand! Will definitely post pics of the Jailhouse, assumuming it fits – will wear it for Dressember if it does :)

          • Roisin says:

            I really want the red one, but I’ve ordered the white one with purple flowers (and a circle skirt!) because it was in the sale. If it’s a good fit I’ll get the red one. Nic is considering getting me the Rita for Christmas, maybe – what is the colour like in real life? x

            • Amber says:

              I know the one you mean – it’s gorgeous :) The Rita is beautiful in real life – very true to the colour of the photos, a kind of bright turquoisey-green, if that makes sense.

  • Tali says:

    Erin’s comment about the hair dryer is hilareous))

    You know, I used to live in place where we got snow in September and it was not gone till late May. And it was -45C in the winter. And we did go to school! And the cars managed to get everywhere! And it was quite a small city far away form any civilization.

    Now how come that a country that gets snow every winter doesn’t have their hospitals open once it begins to snow? Beats me. Same happens here in Holland as well btw.

    Ow, and in Jerusalem they have snow for 1-2 days in the winter. It paralyzes the city completely as well)

    • Amber says:

      We don’t actually get snow every winter – until last year we used to hardly ever get snow, so last winter was a real surprise! This time round, though, I’d have thought people would be a little more prepared – I mean, it had been forecast for about a week before it actually arrived, so I’ve no idea why the hospitals etc weren’t better prepared for it: if I knew it was coming, you’d think they would know too!

      • Tali says:

        I’m afraid it’s the usual case of “don’t do nothing until something serious happens”. Hope the worst that will happen is that the snow will melt))

  • Panthera says:

    Having grown up in North of Norway, I’m used to snow (well, snow from the sky at least, on the ground it turned into slush) half the year, and never had any problem with flying out of there.

    But, after moving to Oslo, I see the same thing, the last two years we’ve had news reports going “haha, Great Britain has had snow, and all flights have been postponed. Here have some pics of their “snow problem”.
    In other news, several trams have had electrical problems because of snow, and our new subways have been taken out of commission for the season, as it seems we’ve bought transportation not made for cold/snowy weather…”
    (Why did we buy subways from Italy without even considering they needed rebuilding for colder weather?.. -.-)

    At least your news doesn’t poke fun before their OMGsnow reports..

    I’m sure you’ll be able to go on your holiday in a week, after all, the air ports are most of all interested in making money.. ^^

    If nothing else works, you can take a boat to Norway and fly out of here, I promise you our air ports do not shut down because of snow, then we couldn’t fly half the year. They use special machines for plowing the air field and de-izing the planes.

    • Amber says:

      We have those machines too – the problem is that the people whose job it is to operate them can’t get to work because of the snow (and neither can the baggage handlers, security staff, check-in staff etc), so they just close the airport: aaargh!

  • Hayley says:

    We get snow pretty solidly through January and February here, and it never fails that at the first snow (usually in November), everything goes to hell. One would think that people would be prepared, and REMEMBER what to do from the year before, but alas, the summer sun seems to have melted their sense. They forget how to drive in the snow and ice and crews are way too late in plowing and salting the roads. I often wonder how far north one has to live before people stop acting like it’s the first time they’ve ever seen snow, every time.

  • Karen says:

    How frustrating! I hope there’s a cancellation or something so Terry can have his appt. before your trip, but I’ll be hoping you don’t have to reschedule your flight.

    It amazes me too, how places that get snow Every. Single. Year. can still freak out so dramatically and close everything from the first storm. Relatively speaking, it didn’t even look like you got *that* much snow, it looks like 6″ or less, right?

    Anyway, you’ve got another fellow snow-hating, cold-winter-climate friend hoping for the best for your plans to work out. :)

    • Amber says:

      Well, in fairness, we don’t get snow every year – up until last winter it was actually quite rare, and if we did get it, it was normally gone by the next day. Still, last winter was SO bad I’d have thought people would have learned some lessons from it, but apparently not!

      It’s much more than 6″ now – well over a foot in our street, Terry thinks, over 2 in some parts of town.

  • arlene says:

    I’m going to join you in a major stress about the OMGSNOW. It is undoubtedly pretty but if it doesn’t piss off by December 9th then flights may be cancelled and my new car will be trapped in England!!! *sadface*

  • Mhairi says:

    We are just back from Calais where it started snowing on Saturday afternoon and we were stunned with how well they dealt with it. There were 2 snow ploughs working the roads and then directly behind them were 2 gritter vehicles so 4 lorries on the road trying to make sure you could get anywhere you needed to go. When we get back into this country there is 1 gritter truck going up the middle lane of a 3 lane motorway and nothing else. No comparison really!?! I can’t believe Terrys appt has been cancelled, I have just said to David what do we do about all out maternity appointments as we can’t get the car out of the street or if something happens and I go into labour then what do we do? Hope you guys get your flights okay and you get into the sunshine. x

  • Stacey says:

    I hate to admit it, but I am one of those people who’s all “But it’s soooo pretty!” Mostly because where I live, we don’t really get snow but we get ice. We have at least one big ice storm every year that will knock down trees and power and it never seems to go away. If during the day we get sun and it starts to melt, by evening it’s freezing back up again.

    It does suck that the hospital has closed down and people can’t get to work. I’ll change my “It’s so pretty” to “It’s so pretty if you don’t have any plans/emergencies and can stay home and watch it snow.”

  • I feel for you, snow is never good! I don’t find it pretty or lovely, or anything good, because we can’t cope in it. Streets get blocked, and services that are important cannot function… my worst fear is that I won’t be able to fly to my country and see my family in a couple of weeks. Xmas is a huge family event in Spain and with no friends or family where I am the only way is up!!

    Sending lots of positive vibes your way xx

  • Jaynie says:

    I always say that I would like snow from december 15-31, and then it can go, please, but reading your post I’m beginning to rethink that. Maybe if we didn’t get it from october-may nobody would know how to deal with it, and then I’d not be able to fly home for christmas, etc. They have enough trouble as it is — every winter you’d think that about 3/4s of the people on the road had never so much as seen snow before — but at least our hospitals and airports keep going and we have enough snow graters to go around…

  • Mitr Friend says:

    Oh my!!! So sad sweety!!! Here in India Summer is horrible for me. It easily reaches 40C (Note: Not 40F) in peak summers!!! Right now, I’m enjoying my winters & rains… Taking a long walk in afternoons in drizzle – I’m so loving it… Now its like around 25C and its winter for me and I’m oh so enjoying it!!! :)

  • Moni says:

    What I just don’t get is that this panic happens each year. You’d think that the people in charge at the airports, train companies, hospitals, etc. would know that there might be the possibility of snow in late November/early December and that they would have encountered that phenomenon more than once in their lives. But no, as soon as the first snowflakes fall, it’s “Oh my God, there’s some cold white stuff on the ground and everything is slippery! What can we do about it? Help!!!” It’s so ridiculous.

  • Leigh says:

    It’s so pretty, as long as you live somewhere like I do where you get maybe two inches once a year, and it never sticks to the roads. I got snowed in once, back when I lived in Washington state, and it sucked so much. (It wasn’t typical for the area, either.)

    Give me the risk of heat stroke over the risk of frostbite any day!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>