Goodnight Miami

sunset on the beach

Miami sunset

Florida sunset

sunset skycraper

Naples beach sunset

Florida sunset

OMGTERRY

(OK, so most of these photos were actually taken in Key Largo and Naples – you don’t get to see the sun sink into the sea from Miami itself – but you get the message, I’m sure…)

I really thought I was almost over my fear of flying. Well, not OVER it exactly: I still shake in terror any time we hit turbulence, and I can’t fall asleep on an airplane for more than a few seconds, because there’s a small fairly large part of my brain which is convinced the only thing keeping us up there is sheer willpower. MY willpower, to be exact. But over the past few years, I’ve definitely been handling it a little better. On the way out here, for instance, I didn’t even need to cling to Terry’s hand on take-off or anything. I just sat there like a normal person, flicking through the in-flight magazine and wondering if the child in the seat behind me was going to kick my seat ALL the way to America, or just PART of the way. (Answer: ALL. THE. FREAKING. WAY.) I’d like to think this new “No Drama Amber” thing (Ha! AS IF.) is because I’m getting all grown-up or something, but actually I reckon it’s simply because the UK is so gloomy and depressing most of the time that flying feels a lot like escaping to me now, and there’s not a lot I wouldn’t do for the chance to escape, for a little while at least.

So I thought I was getting better, and although I’ve spent the last few days weighed down with the sadness of leaving, I hadn’t actually been fearing for my life, you know? And then a plane hit the runway in San Francisco, and all of sudden it’s all I can think of. My family did their best to hide to the images from me, and it worked for a day, maybe more, (Well, I’m on vacation, who needs the news?) but then, of course, I saw them, and a dark cloud descended. I don’t want anyone to think I’m trying to make this tragedy all about ME, because obviously it isn’t, and my heart goes out to the poor people on that plane: but wow, I think I might have over-estimated how “OK” I was with flying. And now I’m back to being absolutely TERRIFIED.

It’ll be fine. I’m sure it will. And if it isn’t, well, at least I managed to supply those of you who requested it a photo of Terry in those mint green chinos I bought him for his birthday. ” I would’ve hated to have left you all with that particular suspense hanging over you. You may never find out what became of Nigel, the International Man of Mystery Next Door, but by God, you have seen those damn chinos. Well, sort of. I mean, you can’t really see the colour here, obviously, but you can trust me on this: they are minty. “If there’s one thing I want to do before going to my certain death,” I said last night, “It’s to show my readers a photo of Terry in a pair of mint green chinos, doing a comedic ‘Karate Kid’ pose on a beach!” And now that I have, my work here is done. I always thought I’d be remembered for stripes or polka dots, but nope, it’s mint green chinos that shall be my lasting legacy, apparently. Funny how things work out, isn’t it?

Anyway. By the time you read this, I’ll (hopefully) be high above the Atlantic, travelling at astonishing speed inside a scary tin can with wings. Wish me luck…

Key Largo sunset

12 Comments

  • Susana N. says:

    I know what you mean about flying. I hate take offs and landings the most. The accident in San Francisco is scary. Now imagine your plane landing and all you see out the window is the wrecked plane. O.o after landing in San Francisco I still needed to board another plane on my way home to Los Angeles. It’s not a good experience for neevous fliers. Hope you make it home safely Amber. XOXO

  • Erika says:

    Beautiful photos! Flying shortly after a plane related tragedy is never comforting. I will miss your vacation posts, but I have a feeling there are a few more to come… ;-)

  • lynda says:

    You’ll be fine don’t worry and lucky you Scotland is having a mini heat wave so you won’t be overly depressed on your return – its roasting!! Granted its not Miami but at least its better than snow!

  • Stacey says:

    Have a safe trip back!

    My first plane ride was a long one, 11 hours. From Dallas to London. I was young (15) and too excited to be scared, so I was able to sleep on the way there. I think that was the last time I have ever slept on a plane. When we landed, we found out that a plane flying a similar path had crashed like 15 minutes ahead of our plane, killing everyone onboard. The local news and newspapers were full of this horrible news the entire time we were in London. My mom and I decided were we going to find a way to immigrate because no way were we getting back on a plane. But my dad was like, no way am I starting my life over in another country just because a plane crashed. Suck it up and get back on the plane, we’re going home.

    I spent the whole 10 hours back (yay for tail winds making the return flight shorter) willing the plane to stay up. A couple of hours into the flight, the intercom came on. It was, no joke “This is your captain speaking. We are currently flying over the path where the plane recently went down. If you look out your windows, you will be able to see the area where they crashed.”

    Oh I hated him. I sat watching everyone with a morbid fascination that immediately raised their window shades to get a better look, like they would be able to see something.

    • Amber says:

      OMG, I can’t believe they would actually want to point that out to you – how horrible! I had to fly a couple of days after 9/11, and I was absolutely terrified even just thinking about it (Made worse by the fact that they wouldn’t let us take anything onto the flight AT ALL – absolutely everything had to be checked – so I didn’t even have a book or anything to distract myself with): I can’t even imagine how freaked-out I’d be if someone pointed out a crash site while I was flying over it!

      • Stacey says:

        It was seriously one of the weirdest things. I mean, I can imagine another passenger pointing it out, if they had knowledge of it. But the actual PILOT? And from what I could see, not many people were bothered by it; most had their faces pressed against the windows. Then my thoughts were along the lines of “This plane is going to crash because the pilot is rubbernecking. I’m going to die along with these people. These ghouls are going to eat my body just like in that movie.”

        I really couldn’t handle flying with nothing to distract me. I can’t read in a moving vehicle, but to have no music or anything would be awful. I would spend my entire flight just staring at the other passengers, waiting for them to snap and planning my responses – driving myself crazy in the process.

    • Corinne says:

      Oh man! Why would he do that? I think I would just cry.

  • Here’s hoping the flight wasn’t too bad!

    I’m sorry to hear that you’re so stressed at home, I’m glad you have your wonderful family, husband and, of course, Rubin, to cheer you up and support you!

    Things will get better, I promise.

  • Corinne says:

    I hate flying too. It’s strange because when I first went on a plane at 11 years old it was fun, then 9/11 happened and I went on one a few months after and was terrified. I wasn’t scared of being hijacked, but of it crashing. Now I just spend my whole flight looking at the reactions of other people and the flight attendants as soon as the noise/direction of the plane changes. Luckily, I’ve not flown longer than an hour and half in about 7 years.

    Hope you are safe and enjoying the wonderful British summer!

    Corinne x

    • Stacey says:

      I am so glad that I’m not the only one that watches the reactions of other passengers and the flight attendants if any odd noise occurs. Normally they’re all fine and completely neutral. One time though, flying back from Dallas on a little propeller plane that had already been delayed because of “mechanical issues”, we hit turbulence. The flight attendant had the deer in the headlights look, stopped what she was doing and strapped herself into her seat. I had a death grip on the armrests for the rest of that flight.

      Another time, after a flight had also been delayed because of mysterious mechanical troubles, I notice that a guy a couple rows up has a drip hitting him on the head every few minutes. He seems completely not bothered, just wipes it away and goes about his business. So when *I* start getting dripped on, I decide to not panic either. Until a chunk of ice hits me on the head. I call over a flight attendant and explain that I just got beaned in the head with some ice, after being dripped on for awhile. Her eyes get huge and she goes “That’s not good….” So I explain about the guy a few rows up. She goes and talks to him and disappears for a while. She finally comes back (I’m still being dripped on during this time, and this guy is too, but he’s starting to look panicked about it.) and says “Well, what we’re hoping it is is the air filtering system just got a bit frozen and is now thawing. We’ll be landing anyway in about an hour! Here’s a towel!” And she skitters off.

      • Amber says:

        I had exactly the same thing with the aircon a couple of years ago, although it was just water, not ice, thankfully – at first I thought, “Oh, it must be raining!”, then it all of a sudden hit me why that REALLY shouldn’t be happening!

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